Shaazka BeyerleCurtailing Corruption: People Power for Accountability and Justice

Lynne Rienner, 2014

by Heath Brown on September 15, 2014

Shaazka Beyerle

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Political ScienceShaazka Beyerle is the author of the new bookCurtailing Corruption: People Power for Accountability and Justice (Lynne Rienner 2014). Beyerle is senior adviser at the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict and a visiting scholar at the Center for Transatlantic Relations, Johns Hopkins University.

Beyerle brings a scholar’s approach and a practitioner’s eye for detail to the book. She argues that corruption undermines development, but is more than just the conventional government corruption and state-sponsored graft. She includes in her book the corruption of other non-state actors, businesses and private institutions, to broaden how to of this issue. Her focus is on the role of people power to restrain many forms of corruption. The book shows the specific non-violent actions that civil society has used in a variety of national settings to curtail corruption. In the podcast, she describes what has happened in Brazil and Italy, but the book contains other interesting cases from India, Korea, and Uganda. The book should be read by scholars, but also by activists and civil society leaders.

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