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[Cross-posted from New Books in Education] Contemporary American political culture is arguably more divisive than ever before. Blue states are bluer, red states are redder, and purple states are becoming harder and harder to find. Because of this divisiveness, teaching social studies and civics education has now become an overwhelmingly difficult task. Should a teacher share political leanings? How can teachers ensure that students are learning a wide political spectrum? Diana Hess and Paula McAvoy set out to answer these questions and more in The Political Classroom: Evidence and Ethics in Democratic Education (Routledge 2014), from the Critical Social Thought series. The researchers undertook a massive years-long longitudinal study of high schools in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin. From different classroom styles and teacher pedagogy, to impact on students, The Political Classroom offers an in-depth glimpse into the American civics education classroom.

Dr. Hess joins New Books in Education for the interview and you can find more helpful resources on social students and civics education at thepoliticalclassroom.com. For questions or comments on the podcast, you can also find the host on Twitter at @PoliticsAndEd.

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Joseph M. GabrielMedical Monopoly: Intellectual Property Rights and the Origin of the Modern Pharmaceutical Industry

February 19, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Medicine] Commercial interests are often understood as impinging upon the ethical norms of medicine. In his new book, Medical Monopoly: Intellectual Property Rights and the Origins of the Modern Pharmaceutical Industry (University of  Chicago Press, 2013), Joe Gabriel shows how the modernization of American medicine was bound up in the ownership, manufacture, and marketing of drugs. […]

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Daniel DiSalvoGovernment against Itself: Public Union Power and Its Consequences

February 9, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Daniel DiSalvo is the author of Government against Itself: Public Union Power and Its Consequences (Oxford University Press, 2015). DiSalvo is associate professor of political science at the City College of New York, CUNY, and a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute. It is rare that an academic book attracts attention and […]

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Emilie CloatrePills for the Poorest: An Exploration of TRIPS and Access to Medication in Sub-Saharan Africa

February 9, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Medicine] Emilie Cloatre’s award-winning book, Pills for the Poorest: An Exploration of TRIPS and Access to Medication in Sub-Saharan Africa (Palgrave, 2013), locates the effects—and ineffectualness—of a landmark international agreement for healthcare: the World Trade Organization’s “Trade-related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights.” Cloatre takes seriously the idea of TRIPS as a technology in Bruno Latour’s […]

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Donald P. Haider-Markel and Jami K. TaylorTransgender Rights and Politics: Groups, Issue Framing, and Policy Adoption

February 2, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Donald P. Haider-Markel and Jami K. Taylor are the editors of Transgender Rights and Politics: Groups, Issue Framing, & Policy Adoption (University of Michigan UP, 2014). Haider-Markel is professor of political science and chair at the University of Kansas, Taylor is associate professor of political science and public administration at the University of Toledo. Last […]

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Elena ConisVaccine Nation: America’s Changing Relationship with Immunization

February 2, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Medicine] The 1960s marked a “new era of vaccination,” when Americans eagerly exposed their arms and hind ends for shots that would prevent a range of everyday illnesses—not only prevent the lurking killers, like polio. Medical historian Elena Conis shows that Americans’ gradual acceptance of vaccination was far from a medical fait accompli: it was—and […]

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Keith WailooPain: A Political History

January 20, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Medicine] Is pain real? Is pain relief a right? Who decides? In Pain: A Political History (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014), Keith Wailoo investigates how people have interpreted and judged the suffering of others in the US from the mid-1940s to the present. While doctors and patients figure in his story, the primary protagonists are politicians, […]

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Frank R. Baumgartner and Bryan D. JonesThe Politics of Information: Problem Definition and the Course of Public Policy in America

January 19, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Frank R. Baumgartner and Bryan D. Jones are the authors of The Politics of Information: Problem Definition and the Course of Public Policy in America (University of Chicago Press 2014). Baumgartner is the Richard J. Richardson Distinguished Professor of Political Science at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill and Jones is […]

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S. Lochlann JainMalignant: How Cancer Becomes Us

January 14, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Medicine] Cancer pervades American bodies—and also habits of mind. Malignant: How Cancer Becomes Us (University of California Press, 2013) is a sharp, adventurous book by the established legal anthropologist, S. Lochlann Jain. The book simultaneously complicates and clarifies the multiple ways in which cancer and patient-hood gets appropriated, embodied and reproduced through seemingly quotidian activities—from opening […]

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Kenneth PrewittWhat Is Your Race?: The Census and Our Flawed Efforts to Classify Americans

January 13, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Education] The US Census has been an important American institution for over 220 years. Since 1790, the US population has been counted and compiled, important figures when tabulating representation and electoral votes. The Census has also captured the racial make-up of the US and has become a powerful public policy tool with […]

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